NUTRITION ERGOGENIC SUPPLEMENTS REGULATE BLOOD PH. - AN UPDATE

Konstantinos D. Tambalis, Giannis Arnaoutis

Abstract


Ergogenic nutritional supplements are a type of sports food. Sodium bicarbonate and b-alanine are two of the most popular and legally permitted ergogenic dietary supplements. These two chemicals have a comparable ergogenic effect because they help to neutralize hydrogen cations created during anaerobic glycolysis during exercise. The hydrogen ions will exit the trained muscles faster if the extracellular regulatory capacity of the organism is increased by strengthening the stores of bicarbonate ions. And before the acidification within the muscle cells becomes a limiting factor of athletic performance, more hydrogen ions and lactic acid will be produced. The goal of this review is to go over the two most common dietary supplements, sodium bicarbonate and b-alanine, that have been shown to improve athletic performance by neutralizing hydrogen cations created during anaerobic glycolysis during exercise. Sodium bicarbonate and b-alanine are legal ergogenic aids that are inexpensive and simple to make, and they have been used by athletes for decades. The extracellular mechanism of "neutralization" of hydrogen ions that build in the exercised muscle is aided by sodium bicarbonate consumption, which increases bicarbonate concentrations in the blood. The ideal dose is between 0.3 and 0.5 grams per kilogram of body weight, and it should be consumed 150-180 minutes before exercise to minimize or lessen gastrointestinal problems. B-alanine supplementation can also improve anaerobic exercise performance, with a more apparent effect in trials lasting 1 to 4 minutes at high intensity, whereas its ergogenic effect appears to be minimal to moderate in exercises lasting up to 25 minutes. Furthermore, it improves the volume of resistance training; yet, increasing strength has no added advantage. Carnosine reserves in muscle are greatly increased after 4 weeks of administration (4-6 gr/day), operating as an intramuscular mechanism for controlling H+ concentration. Furthermore, a loading dose of 4-6 grams per day in doses of 2 grams or fewer is necessary for a least of 2 weeks, with a larger benefit after 4 weeks. Paraesthesia is the sole negative effect at the prescribed levels (tingling).

 

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Keywords


sodium bicarbonate, β-alanine, exercise, athletic performance, alkalosis

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.46827/ejfnsm.v3i1.113

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