POPULATION GROWTH AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA

Enang E. Ebingha, Joseph S. Eni, John T. Okpa

Abstract


The thesis of this study was to examine the relationship between population growth and socio-economic development of Cross River State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study investigated the effect of population growth on education and healthcare services in Cross River State. Related literatures were thematically reviewed. The study was anchored on Malthusian population theory and Boserupian hypothesis. Survey research design was adopted, while, stratified random sampling technique was used to select four hundred (400) respondents from the three senatorial districts of Cross River State. Elicited data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient (PPMC). The results revealed that the effect of population growth on education and health services are significantly positive in Cross River State, Nigeria. The study concluded that since population growth affect socio-economic development in Cross River State; appropriate measures should be taken to check rapid population growth because of its negative consequences on education and healthcare services in the State. The study recommended that more facilities and manpower should be provided to help improve the quality of education and healthcare services in Cross River State. In addition, rural areas should be made attractive in terms of provision of basic infrastructures and facilities, as well as, proper sensitization that would clear doubts on the obstacles to effective population control such as religion, lack of population education, culture and normative system in favour of high fertility.

 

JEL: F63; Q56; R11; R58

 

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population growth, education, healthcare, and socio-economic development

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.46827/ejefr.v0i0.512

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