PREVENTIVE AND CURATIVE HEALTH SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN BORNO STATE, NIGERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR COUNSELLING

Bukar Umar Ngohi, G. Ali Domiya, K. L. Kpanja, Mallam Bulama Kobre

Abstract


The study which was a survey, investigated the preventive and curative health services in secondary schools in Borno State. Target population of the study comprised of 6,786 senior secondary school students. However, 7,500 staff and students constituted the sample for the study. Researchers’ self-authored instrument tagged “School Health Services Questionnaire” (SHSQ) was used in collecting data for the study. Data collected was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Three research questions and two null-hypotheses piloted the study. Descriptive statistics of frequency counts and percentages were used in answering the research questions while t-test was used in testing the null-hypotheses at 0.05 alpha level. Results of the study revealed that nutritional, medical, immunization and preventive health services are the top most preventive and curative health services rendered in secondary schools in Borno State, while health evaluation and health counselling constituted the least health services rendered. The study also revealed significant differences between school location and health services rendered in secondary schools and that significant differences also exist between school type and health services rendered in secondary schools in Borno State, Nigeria. The implications of these findings to counselling were discussed.

 

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preventive, curative, health services, implications for counselling

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References


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