TEACHERS’ PROBLEMS OF TEACHING OF OXIDATION-REDUCTION REACTIONS IN HIGH SCHOOLS

Kenneth Adu-Gyamfi, Joseph Ghartey Ampiah, Douglas Darko Agyei

Abstract


The study explored how teachers taught redox reactions to senior high school students. Within a case-study research design, six chemistry teachers with a minimum of 7 and a maximum of 12 years teaching experiences from three schools were interviewed. The results revealed four themes; inhibition of instruction, weak instructional strategy, inability to teach concepts, and teachers’ professional development. It was found that teachers employed weak instructional strategies such as expository and out of class group assignments in teaching redox reactions. The study recommends that chemistry educators and researchers should design and develop subject-specific pedagogical content knowledge for teaching redox reactions.

 

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chemistry teachers, instructional strategy, redox reactions, teaching

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References


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