INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR THE VISUALLY CHALLENGED STUDENTS IN PRIMARY TEACHER TRAINING INSTITUTIONS: A KENYAN PERSPECTIVE

Pamela Ochieng

Abstract


Globally, people with disabilities are among the poorest. Traditional development programs often fail to meet their needs for instance, by building new schools that are not accessible and in relation to resource provision, both human and material (UNESCO, 1993). The visual system can be justly considered as the dominant sensory modality in humans. Almost half the brain is devoted to sight, and about 70% of the total capacity of the brain devoted to processing sensory information is devoted to handling visual information. Studies of visual perception have revealed that there tends to be an antinational bias towards the visual modality (Shams, 2000). Less well known, perhaps, is that where there is conflict between visual inputs and other sensory inputs, either the overall perception is determined by vision, or else the nature of the perception in the other conflicting modality is modified by the visual information, rather than vice versa (Shore, et al., 2000).

 

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Keywords


disabilities, visually challenged students, primary teacher training, Kenya



DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.46827/ejse.v0i0.657

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